Hair Loss Classification

Hair Loss Classification

 

First define the range of normal hair loss, normal people fall off 50-100 hair per day, and also have the same amount of hair regeneration. Regardless of the anti-off shampoo selected, this physiological hair loss is ongoing every day. So those who are over-stressed, or who are prone to anti-hair loss products, calm down first.

1. Pulling Hair Loss:

 

Our female students are more common. Long-term habitual traction can cause the hair to fall off in the part with more force. It is too tight with the curling iron used, hard to comb or hairpin, pull the horsetail, and force the tray. Caused by hair. Hair loss is generally characterized by thinning hair. The most common sites are the ear and forehead, and different parts can be affected by different habits.

 

2. Androgenetic Alopecia:

 

also known as seborrheic alopecia, commonly known as “bald roof”, is the most common type of hair loss. The disease is more common in young and middle-aged men. The initial performance is that the hair on both sides of the forehead is slender and sparse, and gradually extends to the top of the head. The forehead is retracted backwards and the forehead becomes M-shaped. As the hair loss develops gradually, the forehead and the top of the head can be fused to each other. In severe cases, only the occipital region and the two hairs remain, showing a “Mediterranean” performance. Women’s condition is relatively light, mainly because the hair on the top of the head is diffusely sparse, but the hairline of the forehead does not move up. It looks like a “Christmas tree” change, but rarely occurs at the top of the whole baldness. Most patients have more oily hair, can have a lot of dandruff, generally have no symptoms or itching, and some hair is dry and lacks luster. The speed and extent of hair loss vary from person to person, and most progress is slow.

3. Alopecia Areata:

 

commonly known as “ghost shaving.” The disease can occur at any age, but it is more common in young adults, and there is no significant difference between men and women. It is characterized by a round or oval shape in the head, and a clear hair loss zone. The hair loss area has smooth skin, no inflammation, scales, scars, and the “exclamation mark”-like hair is often seen on the edges. It is easy to fall off when gently pulled. Initially for the small hair loss area, one or several pieces can appear at the same time, without obvious symptoms. Continue to progress and merge into irregular patches. The hair is completely shed, called full baldness. All hair (including body hair) in the body is shed, called baldness. Most of the alopecia areata can be recovered. The newly grown hair, which is a soft yellow-white vellus, gradually becomes thicker and darker until it returns to normal.

 

4. Postpartum Hair Loss:

 

The main manifestations are hair loss in the forehead and hairline. About 35% to 45% of the mothers will appear in the postpartum period of about 3 months, and can also be seen in about 7 months after delivery. Postpartum hair loss is a resting period of hair loss, which is a physiological phenomenon, which has a certain relationship with the hormone level, mental factors and lifestyle changes in the maternal body. The more the fetal hair loss, the more serious the hair loss. The disease will improve on its own within 6 to 9 months after delivery, the longest is no more than 1 year, this time is almost lactation, not suitable for drug treatment intervention.

 

5. Plucking:

 

Some patients use their fingers to pull out the bad habits of their normal-growing hair. Because the hair is repeatedly pulled out, it forms a patch of bald area, much like alopecia areata. The difference between alopecia areata is that the edges are not as clear as alopecia areata, and there are still many hairs that are not unplugged in the bald area. It can also be seen that some patients pull their own eyebrows, beards, manes and so on. The disease is a mental and psychological behavior disorder, which is related to psychological factors such as mental stress, anxiety, depression, and habits. The daily life of the patient is basically normal. And most people who have such a good person will not admit it, and generally others observe this behavior.

6. Drug-induced Hair Loss:

 

immunosuppressive agents, arsenic agents, antidepressants, hypertension drugs and other drugs can affect the function of hair root hair cells, leading to hair loss. Chemotherapy drugs that treat tumors kill or inhibit all rapidly dividing cells, including tumor cells, including hair cells in the growth phase, so about 90% of patients receiving chemotherapy have hair loss. When these drugs are stopped, the hair will gradually re-grow.

7. Nutritional hair loss:

 

Malnutrition caused by partial eclipse, digestive dysfunction, anemia, chronic wasting disease can inhibit the normal growth cycle of hair, hair thinning, scorching, early white or shedding. Lack of protein, iron, zinc, excessive sugar, salt, selenium, etc., and certain metabolic diseases such as arginine , hereditary whey, metabolism Disorders, etc., are also the cause of hair loss.

 

8. Infectious hair loss:

 

various pathogens such as fungi, chickenpox, tuberculosis, and Treponema pallidum can infect the skin tissue of the head, causing local or diffuse alopecia. After partial removal of the pathogen, hair growth can gradually return to normal. Some pathogen infections produce chronic inflammation that severely damages sebaceous glands and hair follicles, causing permanent hair loss. 9. Scarring hair loss: deep burns, electric burns, radiation dermatitis, immune inflammatory diseases (such as lichen planus, discoid lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, etc.), infectious diseases, skin malignant tumors, etc. can seriously damage the skin The tissue, which causes damage to the hair follicles, forms scars that prevent the hair follicles from regenerating, resulting in permanent hair loss.